Winter Wonderland (part 1)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 1)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 1)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 1)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 1)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 1)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 1)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 1)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 1)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 1)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info

Winter Wonderland (part 1)

Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.

Winter Wonderland (part 2)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 2)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 2)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 2)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 2)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 2)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info
Winter Wonderland (part 2)
Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.
Zoom Info

Winter Wonderland (part 2)

Featuring photos from Manchester and London, this series is a personal documentation of what I feel represents my home town and home country. Some images may strike some people as negative, but for me that is not the case. The images are ‘true’, therefore they are nostalgic.

tokyo-camera-style:

Tokyo Darkroom Style 2
Thomas Beswick has been living in Japan for a few years and recently sent me some pictures of his darkroom setup. His layout really makes the most of a small room with minimal furniture. Thomas writes:

I guess my darkroom may look a little different from conventional ones. Although it has all the basic features of a darkroom, it lacks a water supply and is used from a seated position. Because I live in Japan I am often very busy with work, skating or photography. This doesn’t leave me a lot of time to relax. With this in mind I created a more chilled out environment for me to print in. 
Standing up for 3 hours in a darkroom can grind you down after a period of time but drinking tea in a low chair while listening to your favourite tunes is a good way to make it more enjoyable. The room itself is just a regular room with the light blocked out by a dark curtain. It is easy to set up and pack away which is also an added bonus for anyone who doesn’t have much space to work in.
I usually print until it starts feeling like work. On average I’d say that I spend 2-3 hours per session. In that time, I can usually print about 8 fibre prints or 12 RC ones. It really depends on what I’m printing. If I want to print a predetermined series, I will take longer, but if I’m printing as I go, I might not spend as long on each print.
Since my darkroom has no water supply I have a larger tray filled with water that I put my prints in after the come out of the fix. It’s a sort of holding tank- and once I’m done with the printing session I take the tray to my shower cubical for the wash. After that I’ll squeegee them with a cheap car squeegee on the walls of my shower room. It’s a typical Japanese style cubical which has two big smooth walls. After rinsing the prints, it is the perfect surface to squeegee prints on.
I dry my prints in the shower room as well. I clip the prints from a laundry dryer- it’s a plastic thing with a lot of clips- to my bathroom doorframe and leave a tray underneath for any excess dripping. For fibre prints, once they have dried I put them in a thick book and place a laptop on top as a kind of heat press.

Thomas has made an extremely informative darkroom / printing tutorial video that you can catch on Youtube. If you are even remotely interested in learning to print or set up your own darkroom I highly recommend watching it. 
Check out Thomas online here:
Website (tumblr) tkbmedia.com
Flickr: flickr.com/photos/tkbmedia
——————————-
If you’ve got a darkroom in Japan and would like to share it through Tokyo Camera Style, please send me an email. 
「東京暗室スタイル」始まります!手作りの暗室写真や説明募集中。自分のアパートや家でプリントをしている写真家達、ぜひtokyo camera styleに暗室の写真をアップさせてください。
日本の銀塩パワーを世界へ!

Recently I was lucky enough to have my darkroom featured on Tokyo camera style. Please check it out if you like photography. A big thanks to John Sypal too. Please check out his website www.tokyocamerastyle.com. Peace!
Zoom Info
tokyo-camera-style:

Tokyo Darkroom Style 2
Thomas Beswick has been living in Japan for a few years and recently sent me some pictures of his darkroom setup. His layout really makes the most of a small room with minimal furniture. Thomas writes:

I guess my darkroom may look a little different from conventional ones. Although it has all the basic features of a darkroom, it lacks a water supply and is used from a seated position. Because I live in Japan I am often very busy with work, skating or photography. This doesn’t leave me a lot of time to relax. With this in mind I created a more chilled out environment for me to print in. 
Standing up for 3 hours in a darkroom can grind you down after a period of time but drinking tea in a low chair while listening to your favourite tunes is a good way to make it more enjoyable. The room itself is just a regular room with the light blocked out by a dark curtain. It is easy to set up and pack away which is also an added bonus for anyone who doesn’t have much space to work in.
I usually print until it starts feeling like work. On average I’d say that I spend 2-3 hours per session. In that time, I can usually print about 8 fibre prints or 12 RC ones. It really depends on what I’m printing. If I want to print a predetermined series, I will take longer, but if I’m printing as I go, I might not spend as long on each print.
Since my darkroom has no water supply I have a larger tray filled with water that I put my prints in after the come out of the fix. It’s a sort of holding tank- and once I’m done with the printing session I take the tray to my shower cubical for the wash. After that I’ll squeegee them with a cheap car squeegee on the walls of my shower room. It’s a typical Japanese style cubical which has two big smooth walls. After rinsing the prints, it is the perfect surface to squeegee prints on.
I dry my prints in the shower room as well. I clip the prints from a laundry dryer- it’s a plastic thing with a lot of clips- to my bathroom doorframe and leave a tray underneath for any excess dripping. For fibre prints, once they have dried I put them in a thick book and place a laptop on top as a kind of heat press.

Thomas has made an extremely informative darkroom / printing tutorial video that you can catch on Youtube. If you are even remotely interested in learning to print or set up your own darkroom I highly recommend watching it. 
Check out Thomas online here:
Website (tumblr) tkbmedia.com
Flickr: flickr.com/photos/tkbmedia
——————————-
If you’ve got a darkroom in Japan and would like to share it through Tokyo Camera Style, please send me an email. 
「東京暗室スタイル」始まります!手作りの暗室写真や説明募集中。自分のアパートや家でプリントをしている写真家達、ぜひtokyo camera styleに暗室の写真をアップさせてください。
日本の銀塩パワーを世界へ!

Recently I was lucky enough to have my darkroom featured on Tokyo camera style. Please check it out if you like photography. A big thanks to John Sypal too. Please check out his website www.tokyocamerastyle.com. Peace!
Zoom Info
tokyo-camera-style:

Tokyo Darkroom Style 2
Thomas Beswick has been living in Japan for a few years and recently sent me some pictures of his darkroom setup. His layout really makes the most of a small room with minimal furniture. Thomas writes:

I guess my darkroom may look a little different from conventional ones. Although it has all the basic features of a darkroom, it lacks a water supply and is used from a seated position. Because I live in Japan I am often very busy with work, skating or photography. This doesn’t leave me a lot of time to relax. With this in mind I created a more chilled out environment for me to print in. 
Standing up for 3 hours in a darkroom can grind you down after a period of time but drinking tea in a low chair while listening to your favourite tunes is a good way to make it more enjoyable. The room itself is just a regular room with the light blocked out by a dark curtain. It is easy to set up and pack away which is also an added bonus for anyone who doesn’t have much space to work in.
I usually print until it starts feeling like work. On average I’d say that I spend 2-3 hours per session. In that time, I can usually print about 8 fibre prints or 12 RC ones. It really depends on what I’m printing. If I want to print a predetermined series, I will take longer, but if I’m printing as I go, I might not spend as long on each print.
Since my darkroom has no water supply I have a larger tray filled with water that I put my prints in after the come out of the fix. It’s a sort of holding tank- and once I’m done with the printing session I take the tray to my shower cubical for the wash. After that I’ll squeegee them with a cheap car squeegee on the walls of my shower room. It’s a typical Japanese style cubical which has two big smooth walls. After rinsing the prints, it is the perfect surface to squeegee prints on.
I dry my prints in the shower room as well. I clip the prints from a laundry dryer- it’s a plastic thing with a lot of clips- to my bathroom doorframe and leave a tray underneath for any excess dripping. For fibre prints, once they have dried I put them in a thick book and place a laptop on top as a kind of heat press.

Thomas has made an extremely informative darkroom / printing tutorial video that you can catch on Youtube. If you are even remotely interested in learning to print or set up your own darkroom I highly recommend watching it. 
Check out Thomas online here:
Website (tumblr) tkbmedia.com
Flickr: flickr.com/photos/tkbmedia
——————————-
If you’ve got a darkroom in Japan and would like to share it through Tokyo Camera Style, please send me an email. 
「東京暗室スタイル」始まります!手作りの暗室写真や説明募集中。自分のアパートや家でプリントをしている写真家達、ぜひtokyo camera styleに暗室の写真をアップさせてください。
日本の銀塩パワーを世界へ!

Recently I was lucky enough to have my darkroom featured on Tokyo camera style. Please check it out if you like photography. A big thanks to John Sypal too. Please check out his website www.tokyocamerastyle.com. Peace!
Zoom Info

tokyo-camera-style:

Tokyo Darkroom Style 2

Thomas Beswick has been living in Japan for a few years and recently sent me some pictures of his darkroom setup. His layout really makes the most of a small room with minimal furniture. Thomas writes:

I guess my darkroom may look a little different from conventional ones. Although it has all the basic features of a darkroom, it lacks a water supply and is used from a seated position. Because I live in Japan I am often very busy with work, skating or photography. This doesn’t leave me a lot of time to relax. With this in mind I created a more chilled out environment for me to print in.

Standing up for 3 hours in a darkroom can grind you down after a period of time but drinking tea in a low chair while listening to your favourite tunes is a good way to make it more enjoyable. The room itself is just a regular room with the light blocked out by a dark curtain. It is easy to set up and pack away which is also an added bonus for anyone who doesn’t have much space to work in.

I usually print until it starts feeling like work. On average I’d say that I spend 2-3 hours per session. In that time, I can usually print about 8 fibre prints or 12 RC ones. It really depends on what I’m printing. If I want to print a predetermined series, I will take longer, but if I’m printing as I go, I might not spend as long on each print.

Since my darkroom has no water supply I have a larger tray filled with water that I put my prints in after the come out of the fix. It’s a sort of holding tank- and once I’m done with the printing session I take the tray to my shower cubical for the wash. After that I’ll squeegee them with a cheap car squeegee on the walls of my shower room. It’s a typical Japanese style cubical which has two big smooth walls. After rinsing the prints, it is the perfect surface to squeegee prints on.

I dry my prints in the shower room as well. I clip the prints from a laundry dryer- it’s a plastic thing with a lot of clips- to my bathroom doorframe and leave a tray underneath for any excess dripping. For fibre prints, once they have dried I put them in a thick book and place a laptop on top as a kind of heat press.

Thomas has made an extremely informative darkroom / printing tutorial video that you can catch on Youtube. If you are even remotely interested in learning to print or set up your own darkroom I highly recommend watching it. 

Check out Thomas online here:

Website (tumblr) tkbmedia.com

Flickr: flickr.com/photos/tkbmedia

——————————-

If you’ve got a darkroom in Japan and would like to share it through Tokyo Camera Style, please send me an email. 

「東京暗室スタイル」始まります!手作りの暗室写真や説明募集中。自分のアパートや家でプリントをしている写真家達、ぜひtokyo camera styleに暗室の写真をアップさせてください。

日本の銀塩パワーを世界へ!

Recently I was lucky enough to have my darkroom featured on Tokyo camera style. Please check it out if you like photography. A big thanks to John Sypal too. Please check out his website www.tokyocamerastyle.com. Peace!

Pencil Icon

Darkroom and print making

A comprehensive video about 35mm and 120mm print making. The video discusses topics useful for beginners and experienced photographers alike. Subjects discussed include:

Easy darkroom setup - enlargers,black out curtains, ect……..

Equipment - enlarger accessories, timers, filters, easils, ect…….

Chemicals & developing - explanation of chemicals, step by step…

Colour developing - colour with a B&W enlargers, filters, chems…..

Printing paper - characteristics, differences, dying, flattening, ect…


Please share this video with anybody who likes to print or anybody you think would like to start printing  : D  If you are thinking of starting your own darkroom, I hope the video will finally convince you to go for it!

Please post any other extra information you’d like to share in the comments. Thank you.

Anonymous ASKED:

Hey thanks a lot for the interesting posts. the one about doing camera shopping in Tokyo is enlightening! I just lost my canon powershot G12... and I'm about to buy a G16, but I'm tempted also by the Pentax MZ-1. Do you have any suggestions to give me? I think I'll buy at Fujiya, they have extremely nice prices!Once again thanks a lot - pf


Hey there. Thanks for the message. I’m not up to date with digital cameras but i think fujiya is very good. Theres also many camera stored called kimura camera in shinjuku and shibuya. You might find a bargin there too! Peace

Pencil Icon

Tokyo to Osaka (8mm movie)

An 8mm film documenting travels from Osaka to Tokyo. 

http://tkbmedia.com/tokyotoosakamovie

Shot and edited by Thomas Beswick 

Music by Martin Ballou. 

The film was also used in a collaborative project working together with Jesse Freeman. The collaborative project was entitled “Winter Mondays, Summer Sundays”. Please read the extra information below:   Film Title: Winter Mondays, Summer Sundays 

Tagline: Two directors, Two Journey’s into analogue  Synopsis: Two films: one about a mundane walk to the train station on a winter Monday morning and one about an exciting trip away from the city on a summer Sunday. 

Stylization: Half shot in black and white 35mm film in stop motion and half shot in color 8mm the two films take on the characteristics that the trip dictates. 


Winter Mondays, Summer Sundays from Jesse Freeman on Vimeo.

Credits: Directed by Jesse Freeman & Thomas Beswick

Music by Martin Ballou


imnothinginparticular:

+Really nice write up by John Sypal…expresses more than I had originally even conceived…tokyo-camera-style:

The past few days on this site have seen two posts about places for people to gather and interact with one another and photography. Fujifilm’s corporate presence at their new Wonder Photo Shop in Harauku fills a need as does the indie and Artist run space Pippo over in Asakusa.  Sunday evening was another reminder of the importance of sharing art as both a work but also as an experience. In a extremely cool venue filmmakers and friends Jesse Freeman and Thomas Beswick held a screening for their recent collaborative short film Winter Mondays, Summer Sundays
Once it’s online I’ll post a link but the most basic description is that it was divided into two parts, with Freeman’s measured and stop-motion monochromatic take on his daily morning commute through Tokyo with his Leica followed by the vivid richness of deftly edited 8mm film which Beswick shot last summer on a hitchhiking & Skateboarding tour through Japan.
The film was fantastic and since I can’t post a link now for you to enjoy at least what it looks like you know, the film, I want to say a few words about how - the experience.
Neither guy had to work together, but they did.
Jesse didn’t have to shoot, develop, and print his own film, but he did.
Thomas didn’t have to lug his 8mm movie camera all across the country and pay for processing and invest so much time to edit his footage, but he did.
They didn’t have to go to a darkroom to print out fifty 5x7 prints from the film as keepsakes for the first fifty guests, but they did.
They could have done all this start to finish digitally just like Samsung and Apple shows hip young people doing in their commercials, but they didn’t.
They could have just dumped their stuff to flickr or youtube, but they didn’t.
One hundred people didn’t have to choose to make their way from all over the city to a single location and sit on the floor or stand to watch a five minute short film, but they did.
 Freeman and Beswick created a wonderful piece of art- and were able to make an event out of it for their friends to experience. Communal viewing of a film is a wonderful thing. And while the means by which the soon-to-be-uploaded version will potentially allow more people view the thing per moment than could have fit in the entire building, the fact that last night’s event actually existed is important in ways they internet can commodify.  Even though the screening is done, memories and the catalyst for new friendships and ideas remain. That’s part of it- lights coming back on and seeing the looks on other faces- leaning over and chatting as opposed to commenting and “liking”, that’s really a neat thing to for them to have facilitate. (That’s not to say that Facebook wasn’t instrumental in invitations and online connections. All these things are tools to be used by the desires of people and serve to compliment all aspects. Either one without the other would be lacking. )
 I mentioned the photo space Pippo earlier- their statement of purpose has this great little line in it:
Photography is the art of relationships.
Exactly!
Art is the art of relationships.
Get people together- it’s worth it.
Zoom Info

imnothinginparticular:

+Really nice write up by John Sypal…expresses more than I had originally even conceived…tokyo-camera-style:

The past few days on this site have seen two posts about places for people to gather and interact with one another and photography. Fujifilm’s corporate presence at their new Wonder Photo Shop in Harauku fills a need as does the indie and Artist run space Pippo over in Asakusa.  Sunday evening was another reminder of the importance of sharing art as both a work but also as an experience. In a extremely cool venue filmmakers and friends Jesse Freeman and Thomas Beswick held a screening for their recent collaborative short film Winter Mondays, Summer Sundays
Once it’s online I’ll post a link but the most basic description is that it was divided into two parts, with Freeman’s measured and stop-motion monochromatic take on his daily morning commute through Tokyo with his Leica followed by the vivid richness of deftly edited 8mm film which Beswick shot last summer on a hitchhiking & Skateboarding tour through Japan.
The film was fantastic and since I can’t post a link now for you to enjoy at least what it looks like you know, the film, I want to say a few words about how - the experience.
Neither guy had to work together, but they did.
Jesse didn’t have to shoot, develop, and print his own film, but he did.
Thomas didn’t have to lug his 8mm movie camera all across the country and pay for processing and invest so much time to edit his footage, but he did.
They didn’t have to go to a darkroom to print out fifty 5x7 prints from the film as keepsakes for the first fifty guests, but they did.
They could have done all this start to finish digitally just like Samsung and Apple shows hip young people doing in their commercials, but they didn’t.
They could have just dumped their stuff to flickr or youtube, but they didn’t.
One hundred people didn’t have to choose to make their way from all over the city to a single location and sit on the floor or stand to watch a five minute short film, but they did.
 Freeman and Beswick created a wonderful piece of art- and were able to make an event out of it for their friends to experience. Communal viewing of a film is a wonderful thing. And while the means by which the soon-to-be-uploaded version will potentially allow more people view the thing per moment than could have fit in the entire building, the fact that last night’s event actually existed is important in ways they internet can commodify.  Even though the screening is done, memories and the catalyst for new friendships and ideas remain. That’s part of it- lights coming back on and seeing the looks on other faces- leaning over and chatting as opposed to commenting and “liking”, that’s really a neat thing to for them to have facilitate. (That’s not to say that Facebook wasn’t instrumental in invitations and online connections. All these things are tools to be used by the desires of people and serve to compliment all aspects. Either one without the other would be lacking. )
 I mentioned the photo space Pippo earlier- their statement of purpose has this great little line in it:
Photography is the art of relationships.
Exactly!
Art is the art of relationships.
Get people together- it’s worth it.
Zoom Info

imnothinginparticular:

+Really nice write up by John Sypal…expresses more than I had originally even conceived…tokyo-camera-style:

The past few days on this site have seen two posts about places for people to gather and interact with one another and photography. Fujifilm’s corporate presence at their new Wonder Photo Shop in Harauku fills a need as does the indie and Artist run space Pippo over in Asakusa.  Sunday evening was another reminder of the importance of sharing art as both a work but also as an experience. In a extremely cool venue filmmakers and friends Jesse Freeman and Thomas Beswick held a screening for their recent collaborative short film Winter Mondays, Summer Sundays
Once it’s online I’ll post a link but the most basic description is that it was divided into two parts, with Freeman’s measured and stop-motion monochromatic take on his daily morning commute through Tokyo with his Leica followed by the vivid richness of deftly edited 8mm film which Beswick shot last summer on a hitchhiking & Skateboarding tour through Japan.
The film was fantastic and since I can’t post a link now for you to enjoy at least what it looks like you know, the film, I want to say a few words about how - the experience.
Neither guy had to work together, but they did.
Jesse didn’t have to shoot, develop, and print his own film, but he did.
Thomas didn’t have to lug his 8mm movie camera all across the country and pay for processing and invest so much time to edit his footage, but he did.
They didn’t have to go to a darkroom to print out fifty 5x7 prints from the film as keepsakes for the first fifty guests, but they did.
They could have done all this start to finish digitally just like Samsung and Apple shows hip young people doing in their commercials, but they didn’t.
They could have just dumped their stuff to flickr or youtube, but they didn’t.
One hundred people didn’t have to choose to make their way from all over the city to a single location and sit on the floor or stand to watch a five minute short film, but they did.
 Freeman and Beswick created a wonderful piece of art- and were able to make an event out of it for their friends to experience. Communal viewing of a film is a wonderful thing. And while the means by which the soon-to-be-uploaded version will potentially allow more people view the thing per moment than could have fit in the entire building, the fact that last night’s event actually existed is important in ways they internet can commodify.  Even though the screening is done, memories and the catalyst for new friendships and ideas remain. That’s part of it- lights coming back on and seeing the looks on other faces- leaning over and chatting as opposed to commenting and “liking”, that’s really a neat thing to for them to have facilitate. (That’s not to say that Facebook wasn’t instrumental in invitations and online connections. All these things are tools to be used by the desires of people and serve to compliment all aspects. Either one without the other would be lacking. )
 I mentioned the photo space Pippo earlier- their statement of purpose has this great little line in it:
Photography is the art of relationships.
Exactly!
Art is the art of relationships.
Get people together- it’s worth it.
Zoom Info

imnothinginparticular:

+Really nice write up by John Sypal…expresses more than I had originally even conceived…tokyo-camera-style:

The past few days on this site have seen two posts about places for people to gather and interact with one another and photography. Fujifilm’s corporate presence at their new Wonder Photo Shop in Harauku fills a need as does the indie and Artist run space Pippo over in Asakusa.  Sunday evening was another reminder of the importance of sharing art as both a work but also as an experience. In a extremely cool venue filmmakers and friends Jesse Freeman and Thomas Beswick held a screening for their recent collaborative short film Winter Mondays, Summer Sundays
Once it’s online I’ll post a link but the most basic description is that it was divided into two parts, with Freeman’s measured and stop-motion monochromatic take on his daily morning commute through Tokyo with his Leica followed by the vivid richness of deftly edited 8mm film which Beswick shot last summer on a hitchhiking & Skateboarding tour through Japan.
The film was fantastic and since I can’t post a link now for you to enjoy at least what it looks like you know, the film, I want to say a few words about how - the experience.
Neither guy had to work together, but they did.
Jesse didn’t have to shoot, develop, and print his own film, but he did.
Thomas didn’t have to lug his 8mm movie camera all across the country and pay for processing and invest so much time to edit his footage, but he did.
They didn’t have to go to a darkroom to print out fifty 5x7 prints from the film as keepsakes for the first fifty guests, but they did.
They could have done all this start to finish digitally just like Samsung and Apple shows hip young people doing in their commercials, but they didn’t.
They could have just dumped their stuff to flickr or youtube, but they didn’t.
One hundred people didn’t have to choose to make their way from all over the city to a single location and sit on the floor or stand to watch a five minute short film, but they did.
 Freeman and Beswick created a wonderful piece of art- and were able to make an event out of it for their friends to experience. Communal viewing of a film is a wonderful thing. And while the means by which the soon-to-be-uploaded version will potentially allow more people view the thing per moment than could have fit in the entire building, the fact that last night’s event actually existed is important in ways they internet can commodify.  Even though the screening is done, memories and the catalyst for new friendships and ideas remain. That’s part of it- lights coming back on and seeing the looks on other faces- leaning over and chatting as opposed to commenting and “liking”, that’s really a neat thing to for them to have facilitate. (That’s not to say that Facebook wasn’t instrumental in invitations and online connections. All these things are tools to be used by the desires of people and serve to compliment all aspects. Either one without the other would be lacking. )
 I mentioned the photo space Pippo earlier- their statement of purpose has this great little line in it:
Photography is the art of relationships.
Exactly!
Art is the art of relationships.
Get people together- it’s worth it.
Zoom Info

imnothinginparticular:

+Really nice write up by John Sypal…expresses more than I had originally even conceived…tokyo-camera-style:

The past few days on this site have seen two posts about places for people to gather and interact with one another and photography. Fujifilm’s corporate presence at their new Wonder Photo Shop in Harauku fills a need as does the indie and Artist run space Pippo over in Asakusa.  Sunday evening was another reminder of the importance of sharing art as both a work but also as an experience. In a extremely cool venue filmmakers and friends Jesse Freeman and Thomas Beswick held a screening for their recent collaborative short film Winter Mondays, Summer Sundays
Once it’s online I’ll post a link but the most basic description is that it was divided into two parts, with Freeman’s measured and stop-motion monochromatic take on his daily morning commute through Tokyo with his Leica followed by the vivid richness of deftly edited 8mm film which Beswick shot last summer on a hitchhiking & Skateboarding tour through Japan.
The film was fantastic and since I can’t post a link now for you to enjoy at least what it looks like you know, the film, I want to say a few words about how - the experience.
Neither guy had to work together, but they did.
Jesse didn’t have to shoot, develop, and print his own film, but he did.
Thomas didn’t have to lug his 8mm movie camera all across the country and pay for processing and invest so much time to edit his footage, but he did.
They didn’t have to go to a darkroom to print out fifty 5x7 prints from the film as keepsakes for the first fifty guests, but they did.
They could have done all this start to finish digitally just like Samsung and Apple shows hip young people doing in their commercials, but they didn’t.
They could have just dumped their stuff to flickr or youtube, but they didn’t.
One hundred people didn’t have to choose to make their way from all over the city to a single location and sit on the floor or stand to watch a five minute short film, but they did.
 Freeman and Beswick created a wonderful piece of art- and were able to make an event out of it for their friends to experience. Communal viewing of a film is a wonderful thing. And while the means by which the soon-to-be-uploaded version will potentially allow more people view the thing per moment than could have fit in the entire building, the fact that last night’s event actually existed is important in ways they internet can commodify.  Even though the screening is done, memories and the catalyst for new friendships and ideas remain. That’s part of it- lights coming back on and seeing the looks on other faces- leaning over and chatting as opposed to commenting and “liking”, that’s really a neat thing to for them to have facilitate. (That’s not to say that Facebook wasn’t instrumental in invitations and online connections. All these things are tools to be used by the desires of people and serve to compliment all aspects. Either one without the other would be lacking. )
 I mentioned the photo space Pippo earlier- their statement of purpose has this great little line in it:
Photography is the art of relationships.
Exactly!
Art is the art of relationships.
Get people together- it’s worth it.
Zoom Info

imnothinginparticular:

+Really nice write up by John Sypal…expresses more than I had originally even conceived…
tokyo-camera-style
:

The past few days on this site have seen two posts about places for people to gather and interact with one another and photography. Fujifilm’s corporate presence at their new Wonder Photo Shop in Harauku fills a need as does the indie and Artist run space Pippo over in Asakusa.
Sunday evening was another reminder of the importance of sharing art as both a work but also as an experience. In a extremely cool venue filmmakers and friends Jesse Freeman and Thomas Beswick held a screening for their recent collaborative short film Winter Mondays, Summer Sundays

Once it’s online I’ll post a link but the most basic description is that it was divided into two parts, with Freeman’s measured and stop-motion monochromatic take on his daily morning commute through Tokyo with his Leica followed by the vivid richness of deftly edited 8mm film which Beswick shot last summer on a hitchhiking & Skateboarding tour through Japan.

The film was fantastic and since I can’t post a link now for you to enjoy at least what it looks like you know, the film, I want to say a few words about how - the experience.

Neither guy had to work together, but they did.

Jesse didn’t have to shoot, develop, and print his own film, but he did.

Thomas didn’t have to lug his 8mm movie camera all across the country and pay for processing and invest so much time to edit his footage, but he did.

They didn’t have to go to a darkroom to print out fifty 5x7 prints from the film as keepsakes for the first fifty guests, but they did.

They could have done all this start to finish digitally just like Samsung and Apple shows hip young people doing in their commercials, but they didn’t.

They could have just dumped their stuff to flickr or youtube, but they didn’t.

One hundred people didn’t have to choose to make their way from all over the city to a single location and sit on the floor or stand to watch a five minute short film, but they did.


Freeman and Beswick created a wonderful piece of art- and were able to make an event out of it for their friends to experience. Communal viewing of a film is a wonderful thing. And while the means by which the soon-to-be-uploaded version will potentially allow more people view the thing per moment than could have fit in the entire building, the fact that last night’s event actually existed is important in ways they internet can commodify.
Even though the screening is done, memories and the catalyst for new friendships and ideas remain. That’s part of it- lights coming back on and seeing the looks on other faces- leaning over and chatting as opposed to commenting and “liking”, that’s really a neat thing to for them to have facilitate. (That’s not to say that Facebook wasn’t instrumental in invitations and online connections. All these things are tools to be used by the desires of people and serve to compliment all aspects. Either one without the other would be lacking. )


I mentioned the photo space Pippo earlier- their statement of purpose has this great little line in it:

Photography is the art of relationships.

Exactly!

Art is the art of relationships.

Get people together- it’s worth it.

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